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how to go more places

Ever had luggage at the airport over the 50 pound checked-bag limit? I have. If you don’t take some stuff out, you and that bag aren’t going anywhere together.

A lot of us are trying to get places. In our jobs, in our relationships, in our story. But too often we get held up b/c we’re trying to carry too much stuff with us. We just don’t get called out like at the airport. We try and sneak on by and hope nobody will notice. But in life, that never works.

And the stuff that keeps us stuck isn’t the socks and toothpaste. It’s heavy stuff.

A bad attitude and critical words.

Or pride and entitlement.

Maybe jealously and comparison.

Stuff like that weighs us down big time. Super heavy. Kind words, humility and gratitude are way lighter. It’s like replacing a jack hammer in your bag with a box of chocolate.

So let’s check our baggage weight. Unload or replace the stuff that isn’t helping us get where we want to go.

That’s how we go more places. In our jobs. In our relationships. In our story.

 


				
 
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October 30 Session Summary – Integrity (Regi Campbell and Charlie Paparelli)

October 30, 2012
Panel Discussion: Regi Campbell, Charlie Paparelli and Brad Pugh (moderator)
Integrity – Session Summary

 

PANELIST: REGI CAMPBELL
Regi is an experienced investor and entrepreneur who has intentionally sought to make a difference for God’s kingdom in the marketplace since becoming a Christian in 1983. As president and CEO of Async Corporation, he was recognized as Georgia’s high technology Entrepreneur of the Year. Regi then founded InterServ Services Corporation in 1993, growing revenues to $50 million in four years. Since 1997, Campbell has helped launch eight more start-up companies through his Seedsower Investments. Regi is the founder of Radical Mentoring, an online app that empowers men to mentor other men and he is the author of Mentor Like Jesus and About My Father’s Business. He has twice served as an elder at North Point Community Church.

Regi and his wife, Miriam, have been married 42 years, have two children and five grandchildren.


PANELIST: CHARLIE PAPARELLI

Charlie is the President of Paparelli Ventures and Chairman of High Tech Ministries. Through his role at Paparelli Ventures he is managing partner of iPartners, Torad Engineering and board member for SEMS Technologies. Charlie is a professional angel investor. Since 1992 he invested in over 20 technology startups in the Atlanta community. In addition, he is the Director of Angel Lounge which is a part of StartupLounge.com.

In 1993 Charlie was introduced to High Tech Ministries through its High Tech Prayer Breakfast. It was shortly after this first breakfast that Charlie committed his life to Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior. In 1996 Charlie was chosen by the High Tech Ministries Board to be its first President and in 2008 he became Chairman of the Board. Charlie’s faith is active in the marketplace as he has lead seeker Bible studies in technology offices for the last 15 years and created Blitz thru the Bible, a two hour walk through the entire Bible.

Charlie speaks on entrepreneurship, angel investing, his faith story and what it means to be full-time for Jesus wherever you are. (For more details go to www.paparelli.com) He is married to Kathy for 35 years. He has four children ages 19-31 and is a member of Church of the Apostles.


MODERATOR: BRAD PUGH

Brad Pugh is a Group Director at World 50, Inc., organizing private communities for senior-most executives from globally respected organizations to candidly share ideas and collaborate in a forum free from competition or solicitation. Prior to World50, Brad was working with APAC-regional CEOs and HR executives based in Singapore with CEB. In the past, Brad has been an entrepreneurial leader and founder of several software/web firms. In these companies, he oversaw the creation of products for customers and achieved the sale of two of these business ventures. Brad began his career at Oracle Corp.

Brad has been married for 8 years and has three sons 5 and under. He and his wife reside in Atlanta, Georgia.

 


Opening comments on “Integrity”:

Charlie:

  • When I think of us wanting to be Men of Integrity, I think we need to be truthful in these 3 relationships: Self, God and Others
  • Self: I see these primary areas that threaten my integrity: Lust, Greed, Selfishness and Insecurity. We all have them. What are yours?
  • God: Seek Him, get into His Word, ask Him and listen to Him
  • Others: Who are you sharing your innermost thoughts with? and Who are you seeking advice from?

Regi:

  • Before my full surrender to God in 1983, I was a liar. I was living in the dark.
  • I learned that every sin will always be connected to a lie.
  • Integrity has a way of pointing us to where we are lying to ourselves, others and God.


Can you talk about what your experience around this topic of Integrity, entrepreneurship and business?

Charlie:

  • Everyone looks good and sounds good. When I’m presented a business plan, I always want to hear that person’s life story to get a feel for their life-long integrity and whether I feel like the deal matches the person. There should be a distinct intersection here.
  • I also am looking for whether I can relate to this person and/or their story? Are their commonalities?
  • Integrity has much to do with transparency. If you’re not willing to share the details on your life, can I trust you by investing my money in your business?
  • There’s no such thing as a secret.

Regi:

  • Much of the data that Jim Collins has found connects sound leadership to integrity.
  • Tell me a lie and it’s the kiss of death. If you tell me 1 lie in a 1-hour interview, I’m going to assume you’re going to lie to me 40 times/week.
  • Sooner or later, everybody knows everything.
  • The silent lies are just as damaging as the spoken lies (what you don’t say).


What does Integrity look like for you as husbands and fathers?

Regi:

  • Telling the truth sometimes has consequences but telling a lie always has consequences. It takes guts but hiding truth is lying. It may mean delaying confession on a matter. Pray about it. Take it to God.
  • We must confess any current lies.

Charlie:

  • I once shared some temptations with a non-Christian and he gave me (what I know now was) terrible advice in what I should do.
  • I learned from that how vital it is to consider who you’re sharing your innermost thoughts with and who you are you getting advice from. Are they Men of God?


When we encounter any of the 4 pitfalls Charlie mentioned earlier, how to you combat them?

Charlie:

  • This goes back to the three relationships that are the foundation of our integrity:
    1. Admit this temptation to yourself as one of your weaknesses.
    2. Take it immediately to the Cross. Be truthful with God in prayer.
    3. Share your temptation with another Godly man.

Regi:

  • Pause. Seek Jesus.
  • Name it. Name what is coming at you. “Greed, you’re not going to control me today.”


It seems there are a lot of areas around integrity that aren’t a clear black and white, a grey area. How do you decide what you might disclose in business dealings or negotiations?

Regi:

  • Business is about How and What. God is about Why. Ask yourself: What is my motive here?
  • Consider how you might be spinning things. I point to Matthew 5:37 that says ‘Simply let your yes be yes and your no, no. Anything beyond that comes from the evil one.’

Charlie:

  • Holding back or not disclosing information in these business situations really defines the relationships we want to have.


What about handling relationships you want to maintain when integrity has been compromised by the other person? Or dealing with lack of integrity in the workplace?

Regi:

  • Remember 2 things.
    • There is a God.
    • I’m not Him.
  • It’s not our position to judge. Personally, I’m trying to judge less and perceive more.
  • We’re usually ahead or behind others in different areas. So if we see matters of integrity in others:
    • Walk carefully.
    • Don’t become a self-righteous judge.
    • Seek God’s guidance in letting them “catch up.”
  • Values are caught, not taught.

Charlie:

  • We’re charged to love one another. We all have issues. Let it go.
  • If unethical behavior is consistent with the organization, get out.
  • Don’t work for organizations that are counter to your values.


How can we have lives of accountability around this integrity topic?

Charlie:

  • I’ll go back to the 3 truths in relationship mentioned earlier. We must be truthful to ourselves, to God and to others.
  • Confess matters of integrity to those you trust and share the same values.
  • We all need other guys that we trust to dig deeper, guys that won’t judge us.

Regi:

  • Don’t make any big decision today. A good deal today will be a good deal tomorrow.
  • Like Charlie said, get some guys in your life for the long haul. They don’t even have to be guys you really like. Meet once/twice a month and just get together and do life.


Anything in closing?

Charlie:

  • I believe the single greatest way to measure your integrity is by the quality of the relationships in your life.

Regi:


 
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August 23 Session Summary – Stewardship (Ron Domanico and Price Harding)

August 23, 2012
Panel Discussion: Ron Domanico, Price Harding and Bill Marrin (moderator)
Stewardship – Session Summary

 

PANELIST: RON DOMANICO
Ron Domanico is the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of HD Supply, Inc. (The multi-billion dollar distribution company spin-off from Home Depot) headquartered in Atlanta. Previously, He was SVP & CFO of Caraustar Industries, Inc., CFO for Nabisco International located in New York City, and CFO for Kraft Foods-Northern Europe located in Sweden and Norway. Ron holds an MBA with a concentration in Finance from the University of Illinois. He is on the board of directors for the Coles College of Business at Kennesaw State University, the Georgia Council on Economic Education, the Georgia Amateur Wrestling Association, The Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) Wrestling and the National High School Coaches Association. Ron is a varsity wrestling coach at The Lovett School and the National Teams Director for Team Georgia Wrestling. He is a Georgia High School Association (GHSA) Folkstyle wrestling referee and a USA Wrestling M-2 national referee for Freestyle and Greco-Roman.

Ron and his wife Melody, are the parents of four children: Michelle, Adam, Daniel and Amy.


PANELIST: PRICE HARDING

As Founder and Managing Partner of CarterBaldwin, Price Harding leads one of the largest corporate search firms headqu rtered in the Southeast. With clients in more than 30 states, CarterBaldwin is a nationally focused search firm, helping client companies recruit executives to key leadership roles. Additionally, Price has personally conducted more than 300 corporate searches as well as ministry president searches for Prison Fellowship, Wheaton College, National Christian Foundation, and The Trinity Forum, among many others.
In addition to his work at CarterBaldwin, Price is Chairman of United Technology Group and The Bell Oaks Company, and founder of FooManChew. He is an active investor and board member, having helped launch five “INC 500” companies and is presently involved as an active investor in eight companies.

Price serves on the Board of Directors of The Technology Association of Georgia (TAG), High Tech Ministries and The Trinity Forum. Price and Nancy have two married daughters, and have been married for nearly 32 years. They live in Buckhead and walk, most Sundays, to Buckhead Church.


MODERATOR: BILL MARRIN

Bill Marrin is a Managing Director at World 50, Inc. responsible for enhancing the member experience through programming, networking and facilitating the exchange of ideas and best practices on relevant business and career issues. At World 50, Bill manages the Supply Chain 50 and Enterprise 50 executive peer groups of supply chain and CIOs respectively at top, global organizations.

Bill has been married for 28 years and has three daughters. He and his wife reside in Atlanta, Georgia.


What does “Stewardship” mean to you?

Price:
• Thinking and talking about stewardship takes me to a place of insecurity. Stewardship is an awkward concept to discuss in front of a room full of men, providing snapshots of my personal success and failure throughout my life.
• Story: When my wife and I decided to purchase our first house, we put together everything we had for an earnest money check. When the deal was falling apart and I had tried everything possible to get my earnest money returned, I prayed to God and promised to give the entire amount away if He could return the money. The next day, we received the earnest money back and I wrote a check equating to all that we had gotten of the total less the $400 I had spent on attorney’s fees, and put it in the offering plate at church – my wife challenged me to proceed w/ the entire balance to honor the commitment we had made.
• Key take-away: God helps us write a unique story with our lives if we let Him.

Ron:
• Stewardship is being entrusted to manage the property of another.
• Stewardship in Christianity states that “what you have is God’s, not your’s.”
• You’re given time, talent, and treasures and entrusted to be a good steward of your life
• Stewardship is a concept that you must take from your head to your heart – READ: BELIEVE: FEEL
• The Domanico family has practiced stewardship in multiple “seasons of life.”

  • During “years of plenty,” we were able to plan in advance to continue to give during years of negative cash flow.

 

What does “Stewardship” mean in the relationship with your wife?

Price:
• There were times in our life that my wife was more focused on giving for our family and times where I led the charge.
• Over the years, we’ve leaned on each other based on who was more “bold in giving.”

Ron:
• The #1 conflict in marriage is around finances:

  1. Put together an action and communicate it clearly to your wife
  2. Reduce anxiety in the marriage by evaluating your giving against the yearly plan
  3. Prayerfully put together a family budget and giving plan with your wife
  4. Put together a “what to do when I die” notebook including everything your wife will need to know


How can I be a good steward of my time and keep a strong work/life balance?

Ron:
• Story: On “Marlboro Friday” in 1993, my family lost all of our savings. It was a burden to bear, but you can always make more money – you can never make more time.
• As a heat check on the type of steward you are, keep a close eye on your calendar and checkbook.

Price:
• This might be a controversial opinion, but I personally don’t believe my children need “two moms.” Why?

  1. Most importantly, I must show them that I love their mother
  2. Secondly, I must set an example of hard work and sacrifice
  3. Thirdly, I must be a sanctuary if they need someone to confide

• Outside of those 3, my job is to provide for the family. My daughters have very much appreciated this approach and my sons-in-law are my best friends in the world.


How can we teach our children to be good stewards?

Ron:
• Give each child a checkbook register when they’re old enough to understand. Have him maintain a balance with allowance, giving and purchases.
• Make giving (tithing) a habit. Automate your giving when possible.

Price:
• Teach your child to tithe from day 1.
• Teach your children that “interest is something you earn, not something you pay.”
• Expose your children at an early age to mission work and make sure they “fully experience gratitude.”


Do you every feel guilty regarding stewardship in making {luxury} purchases?

Ron:
• When I was young, I saw the bible as a form of financial “bondage.” Now, I see the principles outlined as financial “freedom.”
• Beyond the tithe, God gives you the Holy Spirit to make sound financial giving and spending decisions. Focus on the relationship w/ God, not the money:

  1. Sometimes the Holy Spirit says “give.”
  2. Sometimes the Holy Spirit says “enjoy and abide.”

Price:
• The bible says “be anxious over nothing.”
• The good Lord likes to give his children gifts – watch your heart and your checkbook if you feel any anxiety over either giving or spending.
• If there are any feelings of anxiety, reevaluate your giving and spending.


Have you always tithed?

Price:
• Accepted Christ at 14, started tithing the next day and practiced since.

Ron:
• Matured into tithing (and beyond) over time.


How do you manage constant requests for you to give your time, talent, and treasures?

Price:
• Create financial margin for an “unallocated giving budget.”
• Use your gifts very wisely for the Kingdom:
With no carpentry skills, should you go to South America and become a ministry carpenter, or reduce your income to fund multiple skilled carpenters for the mission?

Ron:
• Be a faithful steward of your time and talent first, financial resources second
• My personal gifts are around leadership and planning

 
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May 1 Session Summary – Accepting Responsibility and Ownership (Glen Jackson and John Richie)

May 1, 2012
Panel Discussion: Glen Jackson, John Richie, Todd Williams (moderator)
Accepting Responsibility & Ownership – Session Summary

 

PANELIST: GLEN JACKSON
Glen Jackson co-founded Jackson Spalding in 1995 after leading the Atlanta office of an international public relations firm. He provides leadership for the firm, many of its clients and also serves as a motivational speaker for organizations looking for inspiration.

He has been recognized by the Atlanta Business Chronicle as one of Atlanta’s most talented public relations professionals and was honored by the Georgia chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) for his campaign for the Jimmy Carter Work Project of Habitat for Humanity. Glen was nominated in 1991 for President Bush’s “Thousand Points of Light” community service award for a fund-raising project he implemented for midtown Atlanta’s needy families.

An Atlanta native, he is a member of the Atlanta Rotary Club and currently serves on its board of directors. He also is a board member for the Chick-fil-A Bowl and USO Georgia, as well as on the advisory board for the Good Samaritan Health Center and Growing Leaders.

Glen graduated from Washington & Lee University, where he played varsity soccer and was elected to Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership Society.

He and his wife, Claire, have three children – their youngest daughter attends The Lovett School, their oldest daughter is a graduate of the University of Alabama and their son is attending New York University.


PANELIST: JOHN RICHIE

John has been an entrepreneur and executive in Atlanta in the technology and service business for over 20 years, having been part of both start ups and successful exits. John is now a Chair with Convene, working with CEO’s to develop business results and eternal perspective. In this capacity, he works with CEO’s from all over Atlanta helping them build great businesses, increase leadership success and honor their heavenly Father in the process.

John was most recently the CEO of Tax Partners, the largest sales tax outsourcing firm in the US. As CEO, John gave overall direction and leadership of the business from its infancy until its sale to Thomson in February 2005. Prior to joining Tax Partners, John was President of Roundtable Partners, a successful Atlanta based management-consulting firm, concentrating on the financial and operational health of organizations he served. John has also been the COO of Interserv and the CFO and SVP of Gerber Alley. He began his career with the Kimberly Clark Corporation where he held a variety of finance, operations and management positions.

He is a graduate of Presbyterian College and earned his MBA from the University of Georgia.

John and his wife Martha have three married children and five grandchildren.


MODERATOR: TODD WILLIAMS

Todd Williams has nearly 25 years of business development and leadership experience. Currently, Todd is president and co-founder of The Leaders Lyceum, a management consulting firm dedicated to personal and leadership development. His role is focused on managing business operations and technology support for the Lyceum.

Todd spent six years as an executive with The Home Depot and is a graduate of the company’s Accelerated Leadership Program. He held positions within their strategic business development, business operations and business process improvement groups. In one role, Todd led a team in the creation of a new business unit, building an 11-store/two market concept. As the business leader, he managed from startup to a nearly $70MM operating unit with over 300 associates in just over 18 months.

A graduate of Michigan State, Todd has been a long-time, active proponent of strong public education having served as past president of the Riverwood Foundation in support of Riverwood International Charter School.

Todd and his wife Celia have been married for 27 years and have three teenage kids. They actively serve as leaders in the middle school and elementary age programs at Buckhead Church.

 

How would you define “responsibility”?

Glen:
• Godly men are responsible
• Charged to do things with excellence
• Common denominator for responsibility = relationships
• Responsibility is asking the right questions:

  • What relationships are most important?
  • How are things going with those relationships?
  1. Your wife?
  2. Your children?
  3. Your coworkers?

John:
• The essence of masculinity is taking responsibility
• Most big questions in life are full of ambiguity
• You must remember God and lean into the mystery

Glen:
• Wife was re-diagnosed with breast cancer recently

  • Years ago – all I wanted to do is ‘fix it’
  • Now – realized it is more important to ‘feel it with her’, and communicate that she means everything to me

What would you want to tell these guys if you only had 24 hours to live?

John:
• When I was in my 30’s, my identity was wrapped up in my work and family
• Early in my life and career, this wrapped-up career focus served me very well
• Now, I wish I would’ve asked myself 4 important questions: (more on these questions here)

  • To whom have you given the authority to judge your life? (audience)
  • Why do you matter? (identity)
  • Who are you? (identity)
  • Why are you here? (significance)

Glen:
• Ephesians 5:2: “live a life of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God”
• I currently have 85 employees and want everyone to know that I love them
• Psalm 112 is a great example – ask yourself if someone would want to read that about you during your eulogy
• Proper ownership and responsibility requires the proper “grip pressure”

  • Give everything to God
  • Love more, judge less, give God the rest

How do you balance everything in life without losing anything?

John:
• You must make choices

  • “What do you want?” (We all want everything)

-vs-

  • What do you want to pay for? (We’re only willing to pay for some things)

• Will you make the sacrifice?
• There is a price to pay for all choices
• Key point: don’t set an expectation at work that is at variance with your responsibilities at home

Glen:
• Don’t be afraid to say no
• Think about the ‘rhythm’ of life versus balance (Decision Makers likes this TED Talk on work/life)
• Your quiet time is essential for setting the priorities for the day

John:
• Christianity is an individual commitment but a team sport
• If I had my 30’s to do over again, I would’ve created a team of allies to live within the transparency of community

Glen:
• View your wife as your biggest ally in life

Todd:
• Trust your wife’s discernment and submit to her judgment

John:
• With my biggest business failure, my wife said to me afterwards “I never really thought you were committed to the business”
• Did not treat her like an ally and trust her discernment

Glen:
• Had a really tough stretch with my family for a few months…
• During quiet time one morning, felt God telling him to go see his son in NYC

  • Cleared calendar and went and visited his son
  • Key takeaway: wife and biggest ally saw him put his family before work

Todd:
• Must be open to hearing God’s whisper
• If you align with your wife as an ally, you can double the fun of successes and only share half of the angst of a loss

What are a few key signs that you’re not taking responsibility in your life?

John:
• Watch closely to see if you have an inappropriate emotional response to a stimulus
• If you’re not taking responsibility, your emotions will be out of line with the stimulus provided

Glen:
• Always watch your desire for ‘character success’ versus ‘circumstance success’

  • Gauge to see if you are on-kilter with your responsibilities

• The devil is most aggressive around areas in your life where you’re the most responsible

When do you step in when you see someone failing versus letting them fail for a learning experience?

Glen:
• After the second failure, initiate a hard/easy discussion (one that starts difficult and gets easier)

Todd:
• As a father, it’s so hard to watch your child fail

  • Like Glen mentioned, loosen your grip and allow failure
  • Be intentional about challenging your children

John:
• As a father, teach your kids to achieve – don’t praise your kid for things they can’t help – praise them for something they did
• As for boss, you can let your employees fail as long as it doesn’t put the mission at risk

In the business world, how do you manage the idea of being ‘equally yoked’ with your partners?

Glen:
• Write down your values early in the process
• Commit to your values
• Never underestimate how closely you’re being watched by your co-workers
• Never cross the line into ‘disrespect’ with your partners

John:
• If your values don’t align with your partners, it’s going to be a tough road
• Be very careful with partnering with non-believers
• Trust your allies

  • Key takeaway: Godly allies help much more in decision making than my personal thoughts of industrialism

• Go to scripture with humility

Glen:
• Early in my career, my marriage was struggling
• We avoided disaster via blunt truth and turning to other couples for advice
• Your marriage is your basecamp – if you’re not happy at home, you’ll be vulnerable in all areas of your life

Todd:
• Your children grow up in the space between you and your wife

John:
• With our 4th child, my wife miscarried
• After the surgery, I made the mistake of going back to work that day
• My wife served and prayed for me during that selfish period of my life – and the Lord intervened and rebuilt my life

What was the biggest mistake you made during your 30’s?

Glen:
• Put my business before my wife – was not ‘gentle and humble in heart’

Todd:
• Personal pride – I never took the magnitude of the Cross personally

  • My claim to my life and myself relies on what happened at the Cross

John:
• Did not develop a structure in my marriage so that we could share our hearts

  • Learn to feel, not fix
 
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March 6 Session Summary – Priorities and Intentional Living (Rusty Gordon and Chris White)

March 6, 2012
Panel Discussion: Rusty Gordon, Chris White, Todd Williams
Priorities & Intentional Living – Session Summary

PANELIST: RUSTY GORDON
Rusty Gordon, an original Atlanta high tech entrepreneur has led numerous successful business turnarounds, startups and acquisitions over the last 30 years. He currently serves as the Executive Director of Silk IS, the Chairman Speedtracs, and the Chairman QuickVault. His past includes CEO and leadership roles at companies that include Knowlagent, IFLEET, Automated Design Systems, Choice Retail Systems, and Peachtree Software. Rusty has also applied his business building skills to many local technology associations and non profits as a senior officer or board member. These include the Technology Executive Roundtable, Teacherlaptop Association, High Tech Ministries, and Southeastern Software Association among others.

Mr. Gordon received his Bachelor of Industrial Engineering degree from Auburn University in 1975 and was recognized by Auburn as the IE outstanding alumnus in 2002. He is the lay leader of Roswell United Methodist Church and for the last 19 years has focused his service on senior high and young adults in the metro Atlanta area.

He and his wife, Ann, of 30 years have three children.


PANELIST: CHRIS WHITE

Chris has been mentoring men in ministry and business across Atlanta for over 30 years. Currently, he serves as President and CEO of Leadership Ministries, an organization he founded in 1986. In his role he is focused on equipping men to be faithful leaders in their marriages, families, businesses, churches, and communities and to teach them to equip others to be the same. The organization sponsors weekly bible studies attended by hundreds of businessmen in Buckhead, Alpharetta, Perimeter Center, and in Nashville. He also leads Leadership Development Companies, assisting executives with strategic planning, personnel selection, executive communication, life and career planning.

Prior to his current role, Chris spent 10 years at IBM where he was a top sales person in New York City and an area sales manager in Philadelphia. It was during his time in Philadelphia that he and his wife came to faith in Jesus Christ, in large part through the ministry of Art and Nancy Demoss. In 1980 Chris and his wife came to Atlanta and started to experiment with new forms of Christian ministry to men.

He and his wife Suzanne have been married for 43 years and have three adult sons.


MODERATOR: TODD WILLIAMS

Todd Williams has nearly 25 years of business development and leadership experience. Currently, Todd is president and co-founder of The Leaders Lyceum, a management consulting firm dedicated to personal and leadership development. His role is focused on managing business operations and technology support for the Lyceum.

Todd spent six years as an executive with The Home Depot and is a graduate of the company’s Accelerated Leadership Program. He held positions within their strategic business development, business operations and business process improvement groups. In one role, Todd led a team in the creation of a new business unit, building an 11-store/two market concept. As the business leader, he managed from startup to a nearly $70MM operating unit with over 300 associates in just over 18 months.

A graduate of Michigan State, Todd has been a long-time, active proponent of strong public education having served as past president of the Riverwood Foundation in support of Riverwood International Charter School.

Todd and his wife Celia have been married for 27 years and have three teenage kids. They actively serve as leaders in the middle school and elementary age programs at Buckhead Church.


Question #1: In the last 30 years, what is one thing that you’ve done wrong that you would like to share?

Rusty:
• With my first business, I worked 365 days in year one. In year 2, I worked 364. The next year, I took Sundays off.
• Big failure = I failed to realize that time was my most precious resource

Chris:
• After the navy, I spent 10 years doing something I didn’t enjoy and wasn’t particularly good at only considered the money
• Big failure = I failed to realized that money is a great resource, but a terrible master

 

Question #2: Considering that failure, what was the biggest catalyst for change?

Rusty:
• Started realizing that I wasn’t able to please everyone
• Figured out that I had to define my purpose before setting my priorities
• Highly recommend the book “The On-Purpose Person”
• After selling my first business, I reevaluated my life and prayed for a return to purpose
• My key realization was to “submit and listen to God”
• I then learned to manage time as “precious” versus “scarce”

Chris:
• During the initial 10 years of my career, I fully realized the “Peter Principle” where in a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence
• After 12 of my team members threatened to quit, my boss called me into his office and told me that I was a terrible leader
• My key realization = pain is the greatest teacher
• I took time to pray and reflect on “Who am I?” and “the meaning of God” and my wife and I found Christ when I was 36 years old

 

Question #3: Can you be specific about how you apply intentionality to your life/work?

Rusty:
• Constantly studying, learning and searching to understand the bible
• Seeking ‘wisdom keepers’
• Being persistent and intentional about my community understanding that my community has an exponential impact in my life and I will rise or fall with my peer group
• Fathers, be intentional about making sure your kids hang out w/ the right crowd

Chris:
• Created a life purpose statement
• Book recommendation: “Success, Motivation, and the Scriptures”
• Realized that balance is a myth
• “Good can become the enemy of great”
• The strongest Christians are rarely balanced – must be lopsided to the Lord

 

Question #4: What recommendations would you have for the fathers in the room?

Rusty:
• Watch out who your kids hang out with
• Connect your children with another man that you highly respect
• Train your children as if you won’t be around tomorrow
• The work of the devil for high capacity people is busyness

Todd:
• Focus on your biggest influence during the Halloween years (ages 5-12)
• Just make sure to keep them alive before and after Halloween years

Chris:
• The most strategic relationship you have is with your wife
• Good kids will come out of good marriages
• Your kids live in the space between you and your wife

 
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Welcome

Welcome to Atlanta Decision Makers.

Empowering young leaders.

 
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Next Session

Next Session: March 6
Priorities + Intentional Living
Panelists: Gordon, White, and Williams

 
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October 2011 Session Summary: Lessons Learned (Regi Campbell and Bill Dunn)

October 4, 2011
Panel Discussion: Regi Campbell, Ron Dunn and Bill Marrin (moderator)
Lessons Learned – Session Summary


PANELIST: REGI CAMPBELL

Regi is an experienced investor and entrepreneur who has intentionally sought to make a difference for God’s kingdom in the marketplace since becoming a Christian in 1983. As president and CEO of Async Corporation, he was recognized as Georgia’s high technology Entrepreneur of the Year. Regi then founded InterServ Services Corporation in 1993, growing revenues to $50 million in four years. Since 1997, Campbell has helped launch eight more start-up companies through his Seedsower Investments. Regi is the founder of Radical Mentoring, an online app that empowers men to mentor other men and he is the author of Mentor Like Jesus and About My Father’s Business. He has twice served as an elder at North Point Community Church.

Regi and his wife, Miriam, have been married 42 years, have two children and five grandchildren.


PANELIST: RON DUNN

Ron is an accomplished business leader, teacher and mentor to men. He began his career at Armstrong Industries, then went on to launch CarpetsPlus in 1997. CarpetsPlus grew from its original 10 stores to more than 400. In 2002, they acquired Color Tile and changed their name to CarpetsPlus Color Tile. By 2007, they became a billion-dollar business, the nation’s fourth-largest floor covering retail company. Ron remains actively involved as co-president and CEO.

In addition to serving on several boards, he has founded and heads up IRON and One Thing, both Atlanta-based ministries for men. He is author of the book Unfinished Business. Ron graduated with a BA from Trinity University in Deerfield, Illinois and in 2010 was named their Alumnus of the Year. He and his wife, Sandy, have been married for 35 years. They have two married children, two grandsons and reside in Alpharetta, Georgia.


MODERATOR: BILL MARRIN

Bill Marrin is a Managing Director at World 50, Inc. responsible for enhancing the member experience through programming, networking and facilitating the exchange of ideas and best practices on relevant business and career issues. At World 50, Bill manages the Supply Chain 50 and Enterprise 50 executive peer groups of supply chain and CIOs respectively at top, global organizations.

Bill has been married for 28 years and has three daughters. He and his wife reside in Atlanta, Georgia.

Around the room exercise: One word that describes what you’re working on right now? Attendees mentioned areas such as balance, faith, expectations, focus, radical, priorities, gratitude, time, margin and contentment.


Below is a summary of what our mentors discussed and shared with us:

Maintaining work/life balance

  • Make dinner with family a priority
  • Respect and enjoy the Sabbath – be deliberate for a 24 hour period
  • Use the Sabbath to study the scripture and “fill-up” and setup for the week ahead
  • Block out specific time in your calendar to spend with your wife

How to approach making wise decisions

  • Don’t make major financial decision without discussing with your wife
  • All important decisions should be made in 3’s (you + wife + God)
  • Wives are given uncanny amounts of wisdom regarding key decisions for husbands. God often speaks to us through our wives.
  • Find and seek advice from mentors and Christian counsel
  • Build your own personal Board of Directors

Specific things they would have done differently in their 20s and 30s

  • Identify early in your career what drives you
  • Develop a personal life mission statement (start with a life bible verse)
  • Have intentional and meaningful conversation with your wife and family – above all, be present
  • Learn how to fight and resolve conflict with your wife – it’s not about being right, it’s about being kind
  • Put God first: “God is not a priority in my life…God is my life”

General

  • Model biblical Christian marriage for your kid
  • Woo your wife and work daily to build her self-esteem – not so much for what she does, but for who she is
  • Destroy all “hidden drawers” in your life; sooner or later, everyone knows everything
  • Read your bible – look for “IMAX moments” versus speed reading
  • Uninterrupted time is vital with your kids
  • Do the unexpected with your kids – pick them up from school as a surprise… change the rhythms as a surprise.

Books from our panel

Opportunities to connect with others

 
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June 2011 Session Summary: Leading from the Inside Out (John Woodall)

Published on June 1, 2011 by in Uncategorized

A Model for Building an Effective Life

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SPEAKER: JOHN WOODALL

John Woodall is the Director of the Care Network at North Point Community Church in Alpharetta, Georgia. Through the Care Network, North Point staff and volunteers provides support to people in challenging life circumstances.

Much of John’s passion and time is dedicated to mentoring and training men to live on purpose and in balance in their life, marriage, family, work, and church.

John previously served as a senior pastor in Orlando, Florida, and an executive pastor in Reston, Virginia. John and his wife, Debbie, have been married 35 years and have three sons, a daughter, six grandsons and one granddaughter.

 
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April 2011 Session Summary: The True Measure of a Man (Richard Simmons III)

Published on April 1, 2011 by in Uncategorized

How Perceptions of Success, Achievement & Recognition Fail Men in Difficult Times

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SPEAKER: RICHARD SIMMONS III

Richard Simmons III, a native of Birmingham, Alabama, received his B.A. from the University of the South (Sewanee) in Economics in 1976. Soon after, he moved to Atlanta, Georgia, for a year of graduate school at Georgia State, where he studied Risk Management and Insurance. Simmons began his 25 year career back in Birmingham with Hilb, Rogal, and Hamilton, a property and casualty insurance business. The first 15 years of his new career were spent in sales and then he became the CEO for the next 10 years before retiring.

Much of his time was spent volunteering for a youth organization called Young Life, a ministry for teenagers. Through this experience with Young Life, Simmons realized his gift of teaching and communicating his faith to men. He began several men’s Bible studies and developed an Investigative Bible Study for men who were inquisitive about the Christian faith. In December of 2000 Simmons founded the Center for Executive Leadership, a nonprofit ministry focusing on evangelism and discipleship for men. When he’s not spending time with his wife and three children, you will find Richard teaching, counseling, writing, or speaking to men’s groups across the country.

Richard is the author of 3 books, Remembering the Forgotten God: The Search for Truth in the Modern World, Safe Passage: Thinking Clearly About Life and Death, and The True Measure of a Man.

 
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